Making marks: Brand expands to U.S.

cosmetics

Lively Packaging
Design communicates product inside package.

Bounce Bites are made from fruit, seeds and whey protein to deliver the consumer a sustained energy boost. 

The design of Bounce Bites was intended to be light, friendly, unpretentious and represent positive energy, says Anthony Biles, creative director at Biles Hendry. 

“They marry technical and lifestyle; as the nutritional virtues are alluded to in table form in the lower portion of the pack, while the rest of the pack comes to life to engage fun-loving, active people through color and the use of hand writing and drawn elements and the Bounce logo itself,” Biles continues. 

The choice in colors for the pack stemmed from the food category. 

“The food category was more niche and featured a predominance of packaging, which was all about looking worthy and ‘from nature,’” Biles says. “Bounce is a very positive upbeat brand, and as such it has been bright and colorful since 2006.” 

 

Making Marks
Brand expands to U.S. 

A young, French, skincare brand is making its mark in the U.S. 

Noxidoxi, a 4-piece collection is designed to help repair and protect skin from the damaging impact of pollutant in the air. 

The brand targets millennial women who seek healthy, active and meaningful lifestyles. With that target, a design was needed. 

“The packaging reflects the quirky, off-beat personality of the brand and founder in large part, thanks to how we play with the logo,” says Jodi Katz, creative director, Base Beauty Creative Agency. “The design positions the logo askew—which is odd, bizarre and really unheard of in this industry. That bold play allowed us to have a lot of fun on a small amount of space—with the other elements supporting the brand’s effectiveness messages.” 

The brand chose stock plastic bottles and metallic caps for the U.S. rollout, and stuck with the hot pink and subtle gray. 

“This is beauty—there is a lot of pink out there—so we needed to be smart with the pink, differentiating in the design and make sure we didn’t look like any other skincare brand,” concludes Katz. 

 

 

Healthy Options
Another beverage comes to line up.

Juicy Juice, a brand that’s been around for more than 40 years, has expanded its line again, with Juicy Juice Teasers. 

“Juicy Juice Teasers, is a lower-sugar, refreshing beverage that tastes delicious; we wanted the packaging to appeal to a broader range of moms and kids than the current Juicy Juice products,” says Ilene Bergenfeld of Harvest Hill Beverage Company, maker of Juicy Juice. “We designed a logo just for the Juicy Juice Teasers that was fun, energetic and incorporated bright colors on the label to help convey taste and breakthrough on the juice aisle shelves.”

With the launch of this new Juicy Juice product, the company had a launch party to celebrate. 

“We chose Atlanta for the launch party since it is a strong market to reach both media and our target consumers—tweens and their moms,” Bergenfeld says. 

Juicy Juice Teasers are a blend of fruit juice and decaffeinated and caffeine-free teas. 

 

Teams Collaborate
New eyelash product released. 

Two brands collaborate—Red Cherry  Eyelashes (RCL) and Jacqueline Susann’s Estate, who wrote Valley of the Dolls (VotD) created the Valley of the Dolls by Red Cherry. 

Red Cherry is an established brand for eyelashes that features lashes that are 100 % human hair, latex free, cruelty free and handmade, and Valley of the Dolls is a pop culture classic chronicling three young girls searching for love, fame and fortune in New York, Hollywood and Paris. 

The packaging is a custom finished styled box with spot gloss UV touches and an overall curious touch finish, which gives the box a velvet feel through touch. 

“The creative collaboration that we created between RCL and VotD elevated the design conceptual process—and the timing couldn’t have been better suited for a new product launch,” says Ron McMillan, e-Mc2 president. “The personality of the packaging gives a naughty wink to VotD in a modern way.”

 

 

Updated Packaging
Well-known brand gets a refresh.

A brand that’s been around since the 1940s recently went through a packaging refresh for one of its line extensions. 

Wyler’s brand of powdered drink mixes is a sugar-free line extension of the Wyler’s brand. The drink mixes have been around since the 2000s, and the target audience is health-interested women.

“The graphics needed to be refreshing and convey strong taste appeal,” says Linda LeTourneau, vice president and Jose Parado, creative director at Haugaard Creative. “By introducing delicious and refreshing images of ripe fruit and anchoring the compositions with beautiful splashes of water, we were able to create layouts that were simple and yet, innovative enough to pop, achieving our goals and the clients hopes for the project.”

The packaging is litho printing on carton stock. 

“The packaging graphics redesign have proven to be a great success and are performing well in the market,” LeTourneau and Parado say.

 

Packaging Highlights
Brand describes process through packaging.

It’s a beverage brand that means “a trusted friend,” and it’s also known as Kimo Sabe Mezcal, which is a premium-family crafted artisan mezcal imported from Mexico. 

“Authenticity is one of our main values at Kimo Sabe. Telling that story is first done with the look and design of the bottle and the labels,” says Ashley Walsh, COO and Co-Founder of Kimo Sabe. 

“We wanted to make sure the design was approachable, welcoming people to sip Kimo Sabe with us. Because we [the founders] are not Mexican, we also wanted to make sure that we aren’t pretending to be something we are not. This design needed to represent a broader appeal that highlights the merging of cultures.”

The design features warm and earthy tones that reflect the mezcal production process, which starts with agave being planted in the soil. Other earthy tones include orange, red and yellow. 

“We have had an amazing response to our design. It has a gender neutrality that allows it to be liked by both men and women, and many cultures,” Walsh says. “People love the logo—it captures them.”